dollars or cents?

I must first apologise for lengthy abscence,from publishing I suppose I learned that time waits on no man the hard way.
Now unto my thoughts for this post,as I write I have infront of me an article titled ‘red money’ bias. If you are not familiar with what the term red money refers to,then I will be happy to clarify, red money is simply the lowest possible denomination, in jamaican finance that is in other words cents.
Jamaica has experienced alot of financial upheaval and I must say that the cents have suffere the worst, cents are almost worthless, similarly to the one dollar which moved from being a common place specimen to a rare insult, when giving cents or even one dollars the cashier or anyone in particular must be prepared for a rude glare or even a disgusted recoil from the recipient,they act as mere space savers, lounging around in the bottom of purses and handbags,or under carpets,or under furniture or even in ash trays that have been unused, for an indefinite period.
Yet what’s alarming is that even under these circumstances the government still pays to have these denonominations constructed all the way in the United Kingdom only to be tossed around in our pockets and cash registers. According to the article the BOJ last year issued 6.8 million pieces of the 25-cent coin valued at $1.7 million JMD and 8.1 million pieces of the 10-cent coin which carried a value of $810,000 JMD, what’s more surprising is that the central bank would not reveal how much it had cost to obtain them.
I surely haven’t used cents in awhile since I can’t buy anything with it, so why should it continue to cost the jamaican taxpayer to produce cents when noone benifits but the mint.

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Is it that funny?

The other day my lunch with a friend became an awkward cacophony, when their cousins and a friend showed up.
What was most tragic was the fact that they didn’t know me and I didn’t know them, then since it had apparently been a while since my friend had seen them they had a lot, and I do mean a lot of catching up to do, so I sat there while they surrounded us with laughter and jokes of all sorts, to add to the awkward sensation rising in my stomach I didn’t understand, most of the jokes and therefore I could only construct a forced smirk to quell my unease, I had about three refills while I waited for the catching up to end, by the time it did, it was well pass lunch and I went home,feeling unimaginable queesy from the awkward after taste of deep thought.

dollars or cents?

I must first apologise for lengthy abscence,from publishing I suppose I learned that time waits on no man the hard way.
Now unto my thoughts for this post,as I write I have infront of me an article titled ‘red money’ bias. If you are not familiar with what the term red money refers to,then I will be happy to clarify, red money is simply the lowest possible denomination, in jamaican finance that is in other words cents.
Jamaica has experienced alot of financial upheaval and I must say that the cents have suffere the worst, cents are almost worthless, similarly to the one dollar which moved from being a common place specimen to a rare insult, when giving cents or even one dollars the cashier or anyone in particular must be prepared for a rude glare or even a disgusted recoil from the recipient,they act as mere space savers, lounging around in the bottom of purses and handbags,or under carpets,or under furniture or even in ash trays that have been unused, for an indefinite period.
Yet what’s alarming is that even under these circumstances the government still pays to have these denonominations constructed all the way in the United Kingdom only to be tossed around in our pockets and cash registers. According to the article the BOJ last year issued 6.8 million pieces of the 25-cent coin valued at $1.7 million JMD and 8.1 million pieces of the 10-cent coin which carried a value of $810,000 JMD, what’s more surprising is that the central bank would not reveal how much it had cost to obtain them.
I surely haven’t used cents in awhile since I can’t buy anything with it, so why should it continue to cost the jamaican taxpayer to produce cents when noone benifits but the mint.